Android fragmentation, development frustrations

12 04 2013

As a developer we want to be able to produce nice maintainable code, ideally a single code base and deploy that on as many platforms as possible. While on the desktop this is pretty simple, come to the world of mobile and well, things get more complicated, with Android I would say a mess really.

Androids fragmentation makes it hard to support all devices, hell, there isn't even a business case to do so

Androids fragmentation makes it hard to support all devices, hell, there isn’t even a business case to do so

Things to consider

I don’t want to talk about cross platform development etc. rather there are a few blogs I’ve written on this subject already (see Cross Platform Mobile Development – CloudZync blog, and one of my recent blog posts, Cross Platform mobile app) , so for the point of this post, we will presume that you are going to build a native app with a technology like Xamarin (Monotouch). So what challenges are there then to build an app that works on multiple platforms?

Well first off what platforms are supported? At the moment, that’s limited to iOS, Windows Phone and Android devices (no Blackberry in there at all – though I hope this changes if Blackberry 10 starts getting some form of traction in the consumer market). For each of these operating systems we still need to take into consideration the actual platform style, there is no point in trying to deliver a Windows Phone type app to an iOS device as it simply won’t work (they don’t share the same controls and the look and feel would be a very jarring experience). You may be thinking that that means you still need to maintain separate code bases, even with our cross platform technology, but you would be wrong.

The beauty of C# and the whole Microsoft development environment is the way you can structure applications. If you are familiar with MVVM then you will understand my point. MVVM (Model View ViewModel) allows a developer to separate concerns within the application, to be very basic, it means we can separate out the UI elements from the actual working code. (Have a read here if you want to undertand MVVM) So we can maintain a single code base in essence for the app across the multiple platforms even if we change and modify the UI.

Fragmentation

This is the point of this article, while we have to do different things for different operating systems, we have to do different things still for the same operating systems even, well in the case of Android quite a lot different.

With Windows Phone and iOS, life is pretty easy, the only real issues relate to image sizes, so you have to package up a couple of different size options for icon images (which can be a pain). With iOS you do have to consider if you are deploying to an iPhone 5 as opposed to an earlier device, due to the screen sizes. For example, in the CloudZync Zync Terminal app (an app that allows merchants to raise and process mobile transactions), on an iPhone 4, we had to place a “done” button into the keyboard in order to hide it and show the rest of the screen, in the iPhone 5 this wasn’t needed as the screen was longer and we didn’t need to hide the keyboard (something that only really got spotted in testing).

So while doing these few extra things can be a pain, they are all pretty small. Then we look at Android, and this is when things get a little harder and a pain to be honest.

Android not only has a fair few flavours on the market, it also has a number of issues with the types of devices it can be found on. So while we are packaging up 2 versions of an image for iOS, on Android we find we could be packaging as many as 10! That’s a real pain to say the least, but not a real head scratcher.

The real problems arise when we look at the different flavours of Android and how they act. When testing apps across different Android flavours we notice we get different experiences. What is really frustrating is how different those experiences can be and what that means in terms of coding and testing. But things get worse still. For example we looked at developing our Zync Terminal App for Android and looked at a few different Samsung Galaxy devices. All consistent you would think, but nope, they aren’t. On top of that we noticed we had to use different API calls on different phones to access different parts of the device, such as the camera. That becomes so frustrating, not to mention time consuming in terms of development, but also in terms of testing, and time consumption means expensive.

Let me give you a little interesting point about our development, it seems that the cost of building and testing our app on iOS and Windows Phone together was about the same as the cost associated with just building for the major Android devices (so that’s us cutting corners and not supporting a lot of Android devices officially). To me, that can’t be right and is not a good place for Android. I can build an app for two very distinctly different operating systems with completely different experiences for the same price I can build an app for a single platform, Android…

Technically I’m not being fair, as this article suggests I’m looking at Fragmentation, so I’m actually developing for 3 versions of Android and umpteen Android based devices – as opposed to two operating systems in iOS and Windows Phone.

Conclusion

I want to maintain as much code with a common base, and we use Xamarin to deliver our apps on Android. The sad fact is that it doesn’t make much business sense to support all of the Android flavours or devices. The fragmentation issue just makes it too expensive to really develop for all Android variations (especially when we look at the demographics of a number of Android users).

While Android holds a very healthy market share (across all flavours) it makes sense to build for Android, but I do find myself hoping that iOS, Windows Phone and Blackberry start taking large chunks of market share away from Android. As an OS to for businesses to build for, businesses that want to maintain code across multiple operating systems, who want to deploy apps with great consistent robust experiences, Android is miles behind Apples iOS and Microsoft Windows Phone.





Cross Platform mobile app, Zync Terminal

6 03 2013

I haven’t been blogging much as of late, things have simply been far too busy here at CloudZync. However, today I wanted to briefly talk about our experiences developing our Zync Terminal mobile app for businesses.

Essentially the application provides businesses with the ability to generate and complete a financial transaction. Im not going into much more detail than that really at this stage, but what I want to talk about is our experience in building this app a little.

 

Cross platform

One of the big things for us as a company that delivers mobile applications, is being as efficient as possible when it comes to our code base. No one really wants code fragmented (I can’t help but think of Android here), it’s not good in terms of functions, features, maintenance, development etc etc. So we wanted to be able to deliver this application in a cross platform fashion, which really meant looking at an HTML based app.

This particular app still needs to be delivered as an app down to a specific device, and it still needs to utilise elements of hardware of that device – so a real app is required. We opted to develop this in PhoneGap (read more here http://phonegap.com/about/) . PhoneGap is an open source framework that enables us to deliver mobile apps across multiple platforms, using HTML 5, Javascript and CSS.  Our developers essentially wrote the application using JQuery Mobile, HTML 5, CSS3 (and we used KendoUI to help skin the app) and JavaScript.

The app is then built using PhoneGap and packaged accordingly to your target mobile OS. Though I end up with multiple “packages” one for each particular mobile OS, I do essentially have a single code source for the Zync Terminal app.

 

Native would be better? Right?

Well maybe the experience could be a little better with a native application. That would be true if this particular application was more complex, however it really isn’t. The app itself is quite simple, so many of the benefits of writing a native app simply don’t apply.

All that being said, there are things to watch out for, especially as native apps provide a far richer API and link to the underlying hardware and OS. This has caused us issues in some of the apps workflows, with our development team on more than one occasion having to come up with a little bit of magic here and there to get round the problem.  But it’s been worth it, and the end result is an app that we can now package up and deploy to:

  • Apples iOS
  • Android
  • Windows Phone 7, 7.5 and 8
  • Blackberry
  • webOS
  • bada

 

Parting shot

Cross platform in the mobile space is tough, and it won’t get easier. For our other apps we have been using Monotouch, which provides us with real native app capabilities but written using C#. But for simpler apps with cross platform requirements, look to PhoneGap, it’s a neat framework that gets you on lots of platforms quickly and easily – and can be built by developers with mainly web based skills….Not bad…





Is there such a thing as a bad Smartphone?

8 11 2012

If you go online and you look for articles on Smartphone’s you will no doubt find loads of reviews of particular phones, operating systems, features etc. and unfortunately you then more often than not get a biased warped view based on the authors preferred device, brand or ecosystem. Unfortunately actual facts and relative information back down to an average user is just lost or not present. Opinion in mobile is, well everywhere, and yet when we think about it, can we really purchase a bad Smartphone these days?

 

Dumb to Smart

It all depends on what you want from your phone, but many more of us now want our phones to be a useful device, be that just for searching the web, consuming some content or actually trying to carry out some small amount of work on them. This is illustrated by the amount of market share Smartphone’s now command across the globe. But if you are moving from a dumb phone to a Smartphone do we really need to know every feature of that device or ecosystem? Probably not…

 

Purchasing

My brother-in-law works for a mobile phone network provider here in the UK, and I always like to get his insight into the kind of people who come in and purchase Smartphone’s. The truth is that the majority of us just want a Smartphone, and because we have heard of the iPhone or Samsung Galaxy, that’s what we go in and ask for. We have no idea why we want those phones over another brand or device, just that these are the phones that people are aware of, and that’s great testament to both companies marketing capabilities. It also shows that many of us purchase mobile phones still very much based on brands we have heard of and what our friends have purchased. We don’t purchase a phone like we would a PC, spending time looking at the specification, the pro’s and cons of a particular bundle from the store etc etc. We still see phones as a short term thing which will get renewed in 12-18 months (if on a contract).

Obviously I’m generalising here. There are lots of people who pick their phone based on the quality of the device, the camera, the durability, performance and of course the operating system. But these types of people are the minority (though if you read blog posts or technology articles you would think everyone was a phone expert. We must remember that the majority of phone users do not go near a mobile phone blog or technology magazine).

As a mobile phone manufacturer or operating system, this all means that marketing and relationships with the network are the only way to shift mobile phones. The main audience therefore has to be those moving into Smartphone’s for the first time, mainly because anyone who has had a Smartphone for 24 months is probably attached to that operating system, and therefore more likely to stay with that particular device or brand. (Especially if they have purchased a large number of apps) For the likes of Nokia, RIM and HTC this means all is not too late, since Smartphone users make up just over 50% of the mobile phone market, that leaves another 50% of untapped customers. The battle lines therefore are still being drawn.

 

Consumer education

The problem for all mobile phone manufacturers, with the exception of Samsung and Apple, is that the 50% of potential new Smartphone customers are not that into the real benefits of a Smartphone device. Rather they are getting one because they can send the odd email, surf the web and perhaps use Facebook. Let’s be honest, any Smartphone therefore is a great purchase, and no doubt these customers will just request the phones they have heard of, so the iPhone and Samsung Galaxy.  That’s a problem…Though customers will be happy, they could have been a lot happier potentially with a different device or a different operating system, especially if they were shown or told about all the options.

An example is my own mother. She wanted a new phone, but was told to get an Android Samsung Galaxy, mainly because that’s what the sales guy had. He didn’t take into consideration any of her needs, requirements, what she was looking for neither in a phone nor from the OS. My mum actually wanted an OS that played nicely with her office work, an OS that potentially would tie up with her tablet that she is looking to purchase and something that was really easy to use, real easy. For me, that meant really only looking at the iPhone or a Windows Phone, of which the sales agent didn’t have much in-depth knowledge of. He could talk about the iPhone, but as for Windows phone devices or Blackberry, nothing to say at all….In the end I got my mum to pick based on the UI, what felt easiest for her to just pick up and use, and she went with a Nokia Windows Phone 610, an entry level Smartphone that does everything she wants and more.

The point here is that my Mum would have ended up with a phone that she would have thought was good, but not one that was great for her. I think that’s a problem manufacturers have to overcome with network providers and sales staff somehow.

 

Any Bad Smartphone’s?

Essentially, there are no bad Smartphone’s these days, technically. However, there are bad Smartphone matches for users. The problem is that sales staff don’t marry up what a consumer wants to any given device, rather they let the consumer just real off a phone they have heard of, or sell the device they have themselves. This means that a good Smartphone will feel like a bad Smartphone for a particular user because it simply didn’t fit their criteria, or they have since seen another device that better suited their needs….If sales agents and consumers treated phones like a very expensive purchase, one that needed to match to a consumers requirements, then we would see a very different mobile phone landscape of that I am sure, and there truly wouldn’t be a bad Smartphone….Until then though, status quo…





Could Android Die?

9 12 2011

There is a lot written about Android, and there is no doubt, that it has taken market share within the world of smart phones by storm, now commanding around 40-51% of the smart phone market share (depending in which country you are).  But could Android start to lose its market share, so much so that it could even die off as an OS?

Well, let’s not get ahead, but it does have a number of problems which could see its commanding market position being eroded. Though each issues isn’t a major concern on its own, once you start adding all these together, you start to see reasons why manufacturers and consumers alike may well move away from Android…

 

IP issues

If you are an Android fanboy then you may not like this, but the fact is that the Android OS has some liberal code within it shall we say. It infringes on a number of intellectual property rights of a number of different companies, all of which aren’t happy about having their work stolen (in their eyes). Personally I can’t blame these companies for looking for compensation – after all they were the ones that invested the money in the first place in the necessary R&D.

Android has so many IP issues that most manufacturers that ship Android devices, now pay Microsoft a license fee to be able to do so. I know that many hate Microsoft in general and hate the fact that Microsoft is doing this, but again, you really can’t blame them from a business point of view.

This issue may not be a massive one, but it does make manufacturers look at other operating systems for their devices, and there has even been rumours that HTC and Samsung may even look to build their own operating systems (I doubt it though). As a manufacturer, if you have to pay Microsoft to use Android, isn’t it worth your time to also look at Windows Phone?

 

Orphaned hardware

One of the big issues with Android is that Android devices don’t get upgraded. Most Android devices are orphaned in less than a year, meaning that they don’t receive the latest updates to the operating system. For your bog standard user this isn’t a major problem, but for those who like to use apps on their device, this can cause some problems. There are many apps out there that are Android version specific, which means you could find the app you want won’t run on your particular Android device, though it’s an Android app. For the consumer, this is potentially a source of real frustration.

 

Hardware faults

Android devices go wrong more than any other device, which is reportedly costing carriers billions each year. Again this may not be a massive issue in its own right, because this cost must be being outweighed by the money coming in from Android, but it is another negative for Android. If carriers start to feel this cost is getting too high, then Android will have a very tough time of it very quickly.

 

 

Apple hate it…

Whenever we read about Android there are comparisons with Apple’s iOS, and you can’t help it. When you browse smart phones in a store, you can’t but notice that Android devices do look like a bit of a copy of the iOS user interface. With some manufacturers it really does look like they have blatantly copied the iPhone in every respect (I will not mention any names).  We all know that Steve Jobs hated Android and vowed to kill it off, and Apple do still seem pretty determined to do their best here, pursuing a number of injunctions globally stopping the sale of many Android devices.

 

User experience

When you compare the user experience to other mobile operating systems available, you get the impression that functionality wise, Android really does compete. However, as an experience, it’s not great. Many people complain it renders graphics slowly, that it’s clunky, that it’s not intuitive to use and I would personally agree with all these comments. When you compare it to iOS it feels like a poor man’s imitation, and that is not good. When you compare it to Windows Phone 7, well, you start to feel like you are comparing an Austin Metro with an Aston Martin in terms of looks, polish and performance.

 

The power needed and battery drain

Because the way the UI is designed, Android really does need quite a bit of power to start to deliver slick animations and performance. This is why we see Android devices boasting some serious hardware power, all that power is needed to make sure Android performs. But this comes at a cost. And that price is battery life. If you want to use your Android as a true smart phone, then you may well kiss good bye to your battery before you get home from work (probably a long time before you get home from work). Is your phone really smart if you can’t even use it as a phone before the day is out?

 

Viruses and Carrier IQ

Ahhh the dreaded virus word. Android is an open OS, it also has a very open market place, enabling rogue apps to easily make their way down onto devices. Throw into the mix that the OS itself is open source and you can see that it isn’t too difficult to start building rather malicious apps that make it onto the device. Not a great problem at the moment, but as more user make the move over to smart phones, more viruses will be created and the more of us consumers will get annoyed with devices that are so prone to them.

The carrier IQ incident really hasn’t done Android any favours. Though it was also found on the iPhone, it was to a lesser extent. RIM and Windows Phone (along with Nokia in general) won some kudos here by proving that Carrier IQ doesn’t ship on these devices.

 

Different flavours

Google likes to think it controls Android, but it doesn’t in all areas. A great example is Amazon and its Kindle Fire. Built on a “forked” version of Android, Amazon now maintains its OS for Kindle Fire. This doesn’t sound like an issue, but as a consumer things do start to get confusing, all these flavours of an OS is not good (one of the reasons why UNIX couldn’t defend Microsoft within the Enterprise).

 

No go for business

Android is a no go for Businesses in any way shape or form. Simply put, it’s too open and too risky. This won’t ever change.

 

Google and Motorola

The Google deal is of great concern to many manufacturers that use Android. Why would Google help them with Android when they are now in direct competition? Will Google make newer releases available to other manufacturers, let alone provide preview software versions? This coupled with Android IP issues are probably the two biggest concerns to manufacturers – and why we continually hear rumours of them looking at other options (including Windows or purchasing another OS).

 

Interoperability

As we start to embrace more devices and more cloud based services, so we expect to be able to do more things across those devices seamlessly. Android isn’t great for this. But there is a game changer coming, and that’s Windows 8.

Windows 8 enables real connectivity between devices, and seamless integration with cloud services. This is all done with a single UI experience across phone, tablet, notebook, laptop and PC. Once this is released to the consumer, this will be the level expected for all forms of devices. Can Google really get Android to do this quickly and in a fashion that doesn’t feel like beta software? I don’t think they can, but I believe Apple can, and will…

 

Nokia

They may not be dead after all, and if Nokia gets back into the swing of things in the smart phone arena then everyone else needs to watch out. Nokia still commands the largest market share within the mobile phone industry, and recent releases of the Lumia 800 in Asia indicate just how strong their brand is globally. Throw into the mix the deal with Microsoft and you can see the real possibility of a resurgent Nokia…

 

Conclusion

Android is going nowhere for the time being. But all of these points raised in this post are all issues that grouped together, could spell bad times ahead for Android. When looking at the mobile OS world, if you fall out of favour, you will fall out very quickly indeed. We need only look at Nokia and now RIM…





The Android debate

27 10 2011

When anyone talks about Android there is a lot to be said, be it “Android is the most popular Smartphone OS”, to comments that it’s “the stolen OS”.  Steve Jobs even stated he would “kill Android”. But there is no getting away from the fact that Android is a feature rich OS, that it has now almost 40% of the Smartphone market share (though Smartphone’s don’t even make up 30% of the overall mobile market) and that Google owns it, and now a mobile phone company…

Competition

There are so many Android devices out there now, and from a range of manufacturers, so much so, that getting your hardware noticed is tough. When you walk into a store and see so many phones all running the same OS, how do you set your hardware out to be different (especially to the average mobile punter). Price…Oh dear…

Poor mans iPhone

So many people who have Andoird have it because they couldn’t justify getting an iPhone. I know many people who have opted for Droids because of price, but they really wanted an iPhone. The same applies to the “kids” that have Androids. Essentially many have them because of price, and once they get a little older move over to the iPhone. That must be a worrying trend. However,
is it a surprise? Probably not since Android feels like a cheap clunky copy of iOS in so many ways…

 It’s free, it’s Google

One of the reason Android has been a success is that is been seen as the free OS, allowing many a manufacturer to ship it on their devices, enabling Android devices to be “cheap” and swamp the market. That is essentially how Android has got it’s market share, and there is nothing wrong with that.

But is it really free? In the past couple of months we have seen a number of patent deals being agreed with Microsoft for Manufacturers being allowed to use Android. In addition to that, we have seen Apple halting many Android devices due to patent infringement. These are problems manufacturers can well do without. Ask yourself, as HTC or Samsung, do you really want to spend a lot of time on R&D only to have your devices stopped from getting to market? Do you want to have to pay a third party company license to use software that essentially belongs to another company? No you don’t…

Throw into the mix that Google now owns Motorola and has effectively secured its own hardware for mobile devices. This must be a worry for HTC, Samsung and all those that sell Android devices. Do you really believe that Google will continue to provide updates to their OS to give away to competitors of their own devices? If they do, then that’s crazy business thinking from Google.

 

Nokia?

I have read many a comment in the past day or so that Nokia should have opted for Android, or they should be making Android devices as well as Windows Phone. But that makes no sense from a business point of view. The Android market is all ready crowded, and how does Nokia regain its Smartphone market share by entering a dog fight with pretty much every other manufacturer
out there? Especially when all they can compete on is price and some nerdy hardware specs (maybe some design too). That’s just too tough. Throw into the mix the hassles you can have with Android and the fact that Google now owns Motorola, and Android looks very risky…

Windows Phone makes perfect sense to me. In many ways it is the overlooked OS, and that’s because no one really knows about it (phone nerds do, but who else). Not many have actually seen it advertised or ever even noticed it in stores. So for Nokia, Windows Phone market is easier to enter, and they know they can sell aggressively against the other Windows Phone competition.

The Windows Phone OS is good, very good. Pretty much everyone I have seen play with it, likes it, they find it intuitive, they like the live tiles and they love it’s simply integration with social media.  It provides something very different to Android and iOS, and as such, that means making a Nokia device stand out on a shelf is made that much easier.

Finally, Microsoft want to get involved in the mobile world, and they know Nokia are the biggest mobile brand out there (still), and that Nokia can get Windows Phones into the hands of millions of people, and ensure Nokia and Windows Phone grab market share.  I wouldn’t be surprised to see Nokia grabbing Smartphone market share quite quickly, which I am sure will make other manufacturers look closely at Windows Phone and start investing more in that OS. It is already happening to some extent with HTC and Samsung…

To finish…

Android has shocked us all with how much market share it has grabbed, but should we have been surprised? In many respects it’s a free, clunky version of the iOS that DOES cost manufacturers in terms of licensing etc etc. Now that Google owns Motorola are companies confident that they will be given the same OS to compete with Motorola? How many other instances of Android devices being banned can we expect?

All in all, Android may have shot to popularity, but there are many question marks above it, and it seems many more are being raised as time moves on. Will these question marks deter manufacturers from using Android? I believe they will over time, and I believe that Windows Phone will be there to grab market share – and that at the front of that pack will be a company from Finland, a company we all used to love…A company called Nokia…





Kindle Fire in the tablet market? errm…No…

29 09 2011

So yet another tablet has been launched, this time the Amazon Kindle Fire, and again we find another entry into the tablet market is being touted as a possible iPad killer. But is it really? Have companies, such as Amazon, RIM, HP etc actually got it right when it comes to tablets? I don’t think so…

Kindle Fire

Is the Amazon Kindle Fire anything new in the tablet marketplace?

In the beginning there was Bill…

It seems an age ago that we heard Bill Gates telling us that the future of mobile computing was with touch, and he showed us a number of “Slate laptop” type things. I loved this concept, but unfortunately the UI just didn’t lend itself to this kind of touch environment, and as a result, business and consumers didn’t embrace the whole thing.

Fast forward a number of years and we have Apple announcing the first iPhone, which to be fair was not a great phone in terms of features. However, what Apple did was deliver a user experience that was not even closely matched, they delivered a sleek easy to use, touch based UI and consumers loved it. Add on top of this the “app” store capabilities and we soon have what we know as the leading smartPhone on the market.

 

Phones lead the way for tablets

Essentially tablets were dead, until Apple then decided to manufacturer what seemed to be, a bigger iPhone but without the phone capabilities, tablet. The iOS suited touch, and was easy to use, and it
appealed to consumers who liked the idea of surfing the web from their sofa on something bigger than their phone. It appealed to us running Apps on a bigger screen. And, well, the iPad has taken off. It dominates the tablet market place, and when you look at the competition, you can see why.

Many state the tablet market is highly competitive, and that is true if you aren’t Apple. Essentially everyone else is fighting it out for Apple scraps in this marketplace, which Apple has a monopoly on. All the other offerings have come at the tablet market in pretty much the same way, thats use a touch based phone OS and get it on a tablet…Namely Android in the majority of cases.

 

What a consumer actually wants?

Yesterday with the launch of the Amazon Kindle Fire, many people said it will succeed because it delivers what consumers want, well I’m not so sure. Analysts are constantly stating that Amazon has people’s card details, so it’s easy for them to open up their online stores and make content and apps highly available to the consumer, allowing the purchase sequence to be seamless. Well I am sorry, having to re-enter some card details is no barrier to a consumer at all. Also, do we really feel comfortable with so many companies now holding our card details? Just look at the Sony incident? In
addition, we are all making the assumption that all the consumer wants to do is consum simple Apps, books, videos and music on their tablets. Well I don’t agree…

 

Problems…

So is what the Kindle Fire offering more of what consumer’s want (well the Price maybe), but probably not. Do we honestly see people looking at the iPad and then thinking, No, I will opt for the Amazon Kindle Fire? I don’t. Do we really see people looking at other tablets that aren’t the iPad and thinking, I will go for the Amazon device because the seamless payment is better? No. Do we see people opting for the Kindle Fire to replace their Kindles? Now that’s a BIG NO…People bought the Kindle as an eReader, and it’s brilliant at that. Not because its easy to buy books on (though that is true), not because Amazon has my card details, but because I can actually read a book as if it was a real book. Dont get this confused with the user experience. The eInk screen is brilliant, you don’t get eye strain like you do from a tablet, you can read it outside, and essentially, it works well…The Kindle Fire, is not the same, it’s a standard colour tablet, which means I am not going to be getting rid of my Kindle to read Kindle books on that…

So there are a number of problems here. Finally, do we see people going for a tablet that is so small? So far, tablets of around the 7” size haven’t made much of an impression, and I can see why. With smartPhones offering almost everything a tablet does in term of apps etc. what is the real benefit of having a tablet that in some cases is only 2” bigger? Amazon Kindle Fire or HTC Titan Phone?

 

Flexibility, consumer need and business drivers

Tablets are here to stay, but the next big thing in them is actually to deliver real flexibility in terms of how we use computers today. At the moment, tablets are too much like big phones than they are small portable computers. But don’t get me wrong, for many consumers this is perfect for them. I know some people run quite complicated Apps, but this is a rare feature. If I want to do some real computing, and some real tasks I need at least a notebook, or a laptop, hell even a fully blown PC in many cases…

Let me give you an example. One of the Directors I work with, bought an iPad 2, which he takes to all meetings we have, which he loves and uses a lot. However, I take a notebook running Windows 7 Starter. Why? Well it’s my need. I would love to take a tablet, but none exist that allow me to do all the things I want to (at the moment that is). While he looks at the odd app, browses the web on his iPad, and that’s about it, I have to plug my machine into projection screens, I have to run presentations, I have to modify those presentations, I have to go through technical prototypes and even
demonstrate applications, proof of concepts and much more, all from that little notebook. And that notebook is holding real databases on it, real development environments.

When I go on holiday, I take the notebook with me, as I can pretty much do everything I need on it (well within reason). I would love to swap it for a tablet, and have that user experience you get with a tablet for the 60% of my needs, but I simply can’t because of the other 40% of needs. So for me, I make do on my phone for what people use tablets for, and I own a notebook. What I want is real flexibility in the tablet marketplace…

The same applies for businesses. While some have adopted the iPad for certain applications, many find that it doesn’t quite deliver everything they need. The limitations of using essentially a Phone OS is too limiting for business and power users. We even find that businesses want to be able to run certain applications on a tablet, but this just isn’t possible, so reps etc use notebooks or take fully blown laptops with them…

 

Tablet market future?

Well who knows. I for one don’t believe iOS is going to be rivalled by any Android based tablet. Nor do I believe that the iPad will come up against much competition based on devices that rely on “content access” and “seamless payments” as major selling points. No, the Apple iPad will only be challenged once more is possible with a tablet than is currently on show in the market.

Enter Windows 8…Windows 8 could potentially be a game changer in this market. On many tablet devices it will run only “Metro”, but it is running real windows and delivers the power of a PC, and that flexibility to a tablet. In addition, on some tablets (just like the one given away by Samsung at Microsoft’s BUILD conference just a few weeks ago), you will have the full power of a PC, with “Metro” and access to the real desktop.

Windows 8, Metro Style

Windows 8 could be the game changer in the tablet marketplace

What does this mean? Well it means for typical “tablet needs” that we see in the market today, you have that with Windows 8. You have access to the Microsoft App store and you will have access to content from Amazon, eBay etc just as you do from your PC. In addition you have a full PC there, in your hands, so if you need to do more with it you can. You also have the option of different devices running the same software, and at different price ranges (just like we have today with PCs).

Going back to my own example. Windows 8 on a tablet would mean I would ditch the notebook. I would use the tablet 60% of the time, just like people use their iPads today. But, when I need to, I am able to carry out that other 40% of tasks on the same device. (Note I will not be replacing my PC, anyone who things we will only own tablets instead of PCs is wrong, or they see us with tablets accessing far larger screen). I will take away a USB keyboard and maybe a docking station for the device, and I can use it just as I use my computer at work. Now that’s real flexibility. Throw in all the added benefits of being connected to Azure with Windows 8, and I find that my little tablet is my PC at home, it is my PC at work…Now that’s real flexibility which opens up the tablet market to many more business users, and consumers…

The tablet market isn’t competitive at the moment. But I believe it will be, just not until we see Windows 8.








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 864 other followers